Self tuning wireless charging of multiple devices simultaneously

July 28, 2021 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Self tuning wireless charging of multiple devices simultaneously
Wireless charging technology developed by researchers transfers energy with 90% efficiency within 20-centimetre charging range.

New technology developed at Aalto University may be the key to true wireless charging that enables all devices that rely on plugs, sockets, and charging pads to power up wirelessly. The research team includes researches Dr. Prasad Jayathurathnage and Dr. Xiaojie Dang, and professors Sergei Tretyakov and Constantin Simovski. The findings are published in IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics on 21 July 2021.

While researchers around the globe are working on free-position wireless charging — which would unchain devices from set charging points — the most common implementations involve complex control and detection functions. A transmitter traditionally has to first detect a device presence and position to be able to send energy in its direction, usually done with cameras or sensors, adding bulk and cost to the device.

The new transmitter developed by the researchers bypasses this need by creating power transfer channels in all directions, automatically tuning channels when receiving devices are in motion. Devices like phones, laptops, and other small appliance equipped with a new receiver can simultaneously receive energy to charge batteries or directly power their functions — without ever being in physical contact or being brought to a specific place.

‘What sets this transmitter apart is that it’s self-tuning, which means you don’t need complex electronics to connect with receivers embedded in devices. Since it self-tunes, you can also move the device freely within a wide charging range,’ explains Prasad Jayathurathnage, a post-doctoral researcher at Aalto University.

Picture: 
True wireless charging would mean a little less hassle in a world increasingly dependent on smart devices. Credit: Prasad Jayathurathnage/Aalto University.

Vous êtes certain ?

Si vous désactivez les cookies, vous ne pouvez plus naviguer sur le site.

Vous allez être rediriger vers Google.